What You Need to Know About Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

AlcoholAlcohol can have a lot of bad effects on your body. Not only that, if you’re pregnant, your baby’s
exposure to alcohol while inside your womb can harm them for life. Experts have found out that alcohol
can pass through placenta all too easily, which may greatly damage the baby’s growth. Among the most
common side-effects of drinking alcohol while pregnant is fetal alcohol syndrome, or FAS.

Babies who severely exposed to alcohol during pregnancy may develop these symptoms of FAS:

  • Abnormal appearance of the face (flat ridge between the upper lip and the nose, very thin upper
    lip, abnormally small eyes)
  • Loss of focus
  • Learning disability
  • Mental retardation
  • Poor coordination
  • Heart disorders
  • Any physical deformity, such as abnormal fingers or limbs
  • Sensory problems
  • Underweight
Your Baby’s Risk of FAS

Your baby’s risk of FAS entirely depends on your alcohol consumption during the whole term of
pregnancy. Experts believe drinking alcohol during the first three weeks of pregnancy is the most
dangerous for the baby. However, consuming alcohol anytime while pregnant is by and large not
healthy.

Treating FAS

FAS is a lifelong condition. While a cure is yet to be discovered, there are a variety of ways on how you
can help your child deal with the situation. Prescription drugs, for instance, can help your child deal with
mood disorders. Parents can also enlist the service of a tutor to help them conquer learning problems.
Finally, supportive treatments, such as massage and exercise, may help your child improve movement.

Fighting Against Alcoholism

Winning against alcohol addiction could be very difficult, especially without the help of people who
know how crucial it is for you to fight and win the war. For example, in Utah, women alcohol rehab centers, like annieshouse.com, can help you with your struggle.

FAS is very destructive. By deciding to cut alcoholism, you are keeping yourself and your baby safe from
alcohol’s bad effects.